Naaleh College: Online Jewish College
Share on Google+

 

Naaleh College Course Descriptions

 

AP 101 Human Anatomy & Physiology for the Non-Healthcare Provider
The course of Human Anatomy & Physiology will provide clear, current, concise, clinically oriented coverage of the human body. Students will study the body structure by continually developing understanding of the functions of organs and structures in the body. The class will examine the structures, or morphology, of the body parts--their forms and organization. The curriculum will cover the functions of body parts, what they do and how they do it.

 

BIBL 201 Advanced Genesis: Intensive Analysis *
The course covers the entire text of the Book of Genesis (Creation, Man in the Garden, Genealogy of Mankind, Tower of Babel, Ten Trials of Avraham, Covenant, Sodom, Eliezer & Rivka, Laban, Avraham vs Isaac, Jacob’s deception, Leah and Rachel, Laban, Eisav, Shechem, Yosef and the brothers, Yosef in Egypt, Persecution of brothers, Jacob’s blessing) with a range of well-known Midrashim, sections from the Talmud, medieval and modern commentaries. By the course end, students should be able to deal with a variety of issues in a relatively mature and sophisticated manner.

BIBL 300 Chumash in Depth I
Students take an in-depth look at Moshe’s famous entreaty to G-d in Parshat Va’etchanan. Students also delve into the symbolism, hidden meanings, and G-dly promises of success and survival in Exile that are contained in Jacob's famous dream of the ladder. This advanced class incorporates a close reading of the text along with a practical application of lessons learned.

BIBL 302 Chumash in Depth II
Students examine the powerful stories of Akeidat Yitzchak (The Binding of Isaac) and the Sale of Joseph. Utilizing a blend of classical and modern commentaries, students study these difficult episodes via a close reading of the relevant verses and a deep analysis of the hidden meaning behind these narratives.

BIBL-P 101 Parsha Journeys
Parsha Journeys presents the complete storyline of the first two chapters of each of the weekly parshiyot (Torah portions), in addition to insights into some of the more famous events discussed.

BIBL-P 201 Biblical Topics I: Breishit, Shmot, and Vayikra
This course is an in-depth study of selected topics in the weekly Torah portion, or Parsha, with a focus on character development. The classes cover most of the parshiot from Genesis, Exodus, and Numbers. Each lecture begins with basic primary sources, usually a verse from the Torah, and then studies extensive selections from both the Early Commentators of the Middle Ages and the Later Commentators of the Modern Era. The instructor adds excerpts from classical works produced by the Chassidic and Mussar Movements, and ties together all components of the lecture to present a new insight into one’s life as an inspired Torah Jew.

BIBL-P 202 Biblical Topics II: Breishit, Shmot, and Vayikra
This course is an in-depth study of selected topics in the weekly Torah portion, or Parsha, with a focus on character development. The classes cover most of the parshiot from Genesis, Exodus, and Numbers. Each lecture begins with basic primary sources, usually a verse from the Torah, and then studies extensive selections from both the Early Commentators of the Middle Ages and the Later Commentators of the Modern Era. The instructor adds excerpts from classical works produced by the Chassidic and Mussar Movements, and ties together all components of the lecture to present a new insight into one’s life as an inspired Torah Jew.

BIBL-P 222 Biblical Topics III: Breishit, Shemot, Vayikra, and Bamidbar
This course is an in-depth study of selected topics in the weekly Torah portion, or Parsha, with a focus on character development. The classes cover most of the parshiot from Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, and Numbers. Classes focus on selected topics in the weekly Parsha. The instructor begins with primary sources, usually a verse from the Torah, and delves into its meaning and message through extensive selections from both the Early Commentators of the Middle Ages and the Later Commentators of the Modern Era. The instructor adds excerpts from classical works produced by both the Chassidic and Mussar Movements, and ties together all components of the lecture to bring home a new insight into our lives as inspired Torah Jews.

BIBL-P 302 Parsha Learning Group: Discovering Classical Commentaries
The Parsha Learning Group course aims to uncover the inner world of Parshanut Hamikrah, Biblical Exegesis. Every week, the instructor addresses one topic from the weekly parsha (Torah portion) and reviews the comments of Rashi and other Early Commentators. The class emphasizes learning how to read the text closely and attempts to understand the difficulties that the Commentaries aim to reconcile. This class does not require prior experience in Torah study or knowledge of Hebrew.

BUS 101 Principles of Leadership and Management
This course is designed to give students the understanding of leadership and management in the business setting. The course explains the basics of leadership in the workplace. Students study and practice the leadership skills including communication styles, decision-making, effective leadership, effective management, organization, managing and motivating people, and management in the future.

BUS 102 Business Law
This course presents students with the fundamental principles of law applicable to business transactions. Students are introduced to the legal environment and government regulations. Topics include contracts, commercial transactions of sales, risk, liability and bankruptcy, employment, securities, cyber law, and property law.

BUS 131 Business Communications
This course is designed to prepare students for success in communicating in today’s workplace as well as tips on job-searching skills. The course explains the basics of communicating in the workplace, working in teams, being a good listener and understanding business etiquette. Students study and practice the skills and activities involved in the writing process including the appropriate use of social media, preparing formal reports and proposals as well as informal business reports. Guidance is provided in proper grammar and writing mechanics as well as information on formatting and writing documents. A wealth of ideas for writing resumes and cover letters, participating in interviews, and completing follow-up activities are offered.

BUS 111 Principles of Accounting
This course offers students principles of accounting and their relationship to business through fundamental concepts. Basics of business accounting are presented including transactions, financial statements, the accounting cycle, accounting information systems, accounts payable and receivable, assets, liabilities, payroll, partnerships in accounting, corporate accounting, financial statements, and budgets.

BUS 201 Operations Management Pre-requisites: BUS 101
Learn to improve and analyze business processes, increase productivity while delivering higher quality, both in services and manufacturing. Process analysis, flows rates, bottlenecks, and inventory levels are all key concepts taught in this course. This course discusses the strategic role of operations within an organization. Students learn to use tools and techniques for planning, control, and continuous improvement of a company's operations

BUS 202 Human Resource Management Pre-requisites: BUS 101
HR Management involves learning about employee selection, training, and labor relations. The course covers EEO issues, wages and salary administration, as well as strategic planning in human resources, and the role of human relations in management.

BUS 221 Marketing Applications
This course is focused on marketing applications found in the business world. Students are introduced to the process of developing marketing strategies, developing an understanding for the buyer and market, and strategies in targeting and satisfying the market. Student will learn how to integrate this knowledge with practical application.

BUS 220 Organizational Behavior Pre-requisites: BUS 101, BUS 202
This course introduces concepts, models and frameworks to help you become better manager. Emphasis will be on behavioral science concepts and research findings related to the major challenge managers face and how to organize individuals in order to fulfill the objectives and strategies of the firm. Topics that will be examined include: the nature and dynamics of the organization; the elements of individual leadership and personal development; managing change within organizational contexts; and the relationships between the firm and the external environment in which it operates. The course objective is to provide analytical skills and strategies, substantive knowledge, and a professional sensibility that will increase your ability to take effective action.

BUS 250 Public Speaking
This course is designed to help students orally communicate professionally in several settings. Students will practice techniques for composing and delivering various types of speeches. In addition to speaking, students will analyze and evaluate oral presentations. The social and political significance of communication is weaved into course activities as well.

BUS 301 Financial Management Pre-requisites: BUS 101, BUS 111
This course gives students a comprehensive and contemporary introduction to financial management. The content focuses on maximizing shareholder wealth and effectively managing cash flow. Students will learn the international aspects of financial management, examine the ethical behavior of managers, and study the effects of a recession on corporations.

BUS 212 Managerial Accounting Pre-requisites: BUS 101, BUS 111
This course is geared towards managerial accounting with content including relevant costs for decision making, capital budgeting decisions, and segment reporting and decentralization. Additional topics covered are job-order costing, process costing, and planning, controlling, and decision making important to successful accounting management.

BUS 330 Entrepreneurship Pre-requisites: BUS 101, BUS 204, BUS 301, BUS 304
Innovation drives the economy. Startup opportunities exists in all areas of expertise. This course takes the student from the initial idea to developing and designing a business to small business management. Business plans, forms of legal entities, new venture funding and strategic marketing are all discussed providing a complete overview of all the important aspects of starting and running your own business.

BUS 311 E-Business Technologies Pre-requisites: CPT 101, BUS 101, 221
This course is designed to introduce students to the essentials of keeping pace with technology, strategies, and implementation in the business environment. The course is a balance of technical and managerial topics central to developing an understanding of e-business or e-commerce.

BUS 312 Information Technology Management Pre-requisites: CPT 101, BUS 101, CPT 108, recommended – CPT 301
This course provides an overview of contemporary I.T. management. It explains the relevant issues of effectively managing information services. The course highlights areas of greatest current and potential application of I.T. to business needs and reviews electronic business, enterprise business systems, and decision support systems.

BUS 330 Entrepreneurship (Recommended for all students) Prerequisites: BUS 101, BUS 204, BUS 301, BUS 304
The module introduces graphic design students to the world of marketing. Students learn about customer relationships through creating customer value and building profitable client relationships. Information is gleaned on how to market one’s skills and talents in today’s economy.

BUS 350 Insurance Pre-requisites: BUS 101
This course will cover the basic concepts of Insurance and Risk Management. Topics covered include life and health insurance, functional and financial operations of insurers as well as employee benefits and social insurance. We will also discuss the new Affordable Care Act.

BUS 360 Retail Management Pre-requisites: BUS 101
Retailing is a growth industry playing a vital role in the global economy. Technology including smart phones, have altered consumer behavior. This course prepares students for careers on both sides of the retailing field: merchandise buying and store management. The course focuses on the financial considerations and implementation of merchandise and store management.

BUS 370 Real Estate Pre-requisites: BUS 101
This comprehensive course in real estate covers a myriad of topics within the world of real estate. The aim of the course is to provide a broad perspective to real estate markets from large commercial property to single-family homes. Financial, legal and economic concepts related to real estate are covered as well as market analysis and real estate development.

BUS 401 International Business Pre-requisites: BUS 101, BUS 111, BUS 204
The course explores the pros and cons of economic theories, government policies, business strategies, and organizational structures as related to international business practices. The course focuses on globalization, national and international differences, ethics, global trade and investments, global monetary systems, strategies and structures of international business, and international business operations.

BUS 402 Project Management Pre-requisites: BUS 101, BUS 101, BUS 221
This course prepares students to work successfully in today's exciting project management environment. Included are details of how to organize and manage effective project teams. Students will learn about planning and scheduling as well as the costs associated with project management. The course covers the latest business developments and challenges students will face such as project constraints, stakeholder issues, the project charter, and how projects relate to an organization’s strategic plan. Students will also be introduced to the latest version of Microsoft® Project 2010, one of the most popular project management software available.

BUS 450 Negotiations Pre-requisites: BUS 101
Negotiating effectively is one of the most essential aspects of business. It is a critical skill for any effective manager. The course explores major concepts such as negotiation strategies and tactics for dispute resolution as well as the legal and ethical aspects involved in negotiation. The course in addition discusses the psychology of bargaining and negotiation.

BUS 460 Non-Profit Management Pre-requisites: BUS 101
Management in the nonprofit sector requires its own separate course. Managers of nonprofit institutions face unique and distinct challenges. This course seeks to provide an overview of all different aspects to the uniqueness of Nonprofit Management. Topics include finances, human resources – in particular volunteers, ethics and governance. Emphasis will be placed on fundraising, leadership and organization.

BUS 470 Health Care Management Pre-requisites: BUS 101
A specialized field, management of health care services requires different tools and skills. This course will cover the organizational principles and practices in health care management. Topics include operations, human resources, health care policies, finances, and the globalization of health care services.

BUS 480 Investments Pre-requisites: BUS 101, BUS 301
The investment course begins with background and continues through investment theory and valuation principles and practices. Students learn about the stock market and bond market. Specific topics include portfolio management, derivatives, asset-pricing models and industry ethics.

JTHO 301 Chassidut on the Parsha I: Shem Mishmuel
This course is centered on the weekly Torah portion. Within each Torah portion, one or two topics are analyzed and discussed based on the book of Chassidic discourses, Shem MiShmuel, authored between the years 1910-1926, by Rabbi Shmuel Bornsztain, the second Sochatchover Rebbe, who wrote his book between the years 1910-1926. This course attempts to deepen the student’s understanding of some of the themes presented in the books of Genesis and Exodus. This goal is achieved by discussing the narratives presented in this book, and synthesizing them with the comments of the Midrash, the Talmud, and Hasidic thought. The concepts presented are then connected to contemporary life, and the students are able to apply the lessons of the Bible to modern issues and challenges.

COM 101 Composition I
This course is designed to help students gain mastery over English grammar and writing skills. By the end of this course, students should feel comfortable writing documents from a simple e-mail to a research paper.

COM 102 Composition II
This course is designed to help students gain mastery over technical, descriptive and persuasive writing. Included are techniques for gaining information through critical thinking and analysis of written word. By the end of this course, students should feel comfortable writing more in-depth documents with the ability to influence the reader.

CPT 101 Computer Applications
Computer Applications is designed to familiarize students with computers and their applications. Students will learn fundamental concepts of computer hardware and software. Emphasis will be placed on computer applications, in particular word processing (Microsoft Word), spreadsheets (Microsoft Excel), as well as basic understanding of databases, and multimedia presentations (Microsoft PowerPoint).

CPT 111 Programming in Java Pre-Requisites: CPT 101(pre- or co-requisite), MAT 102, recommended CPT 210
This course provides the beginning programmer with a guide to developing applications using the Java programming language. Java is popular among professional programmers because it can be used to build visually interesting graphical user interface (GUI) and Web-based applications. Java also provides an excellent environment for the beginning programming. A student can quickly build useful programs while learning the basics of structured and object-oriented programming techniques.

CPT 121 Web Development I Pre-Requisites: CPT 101(pre- or co-requisite), MAT 102
This course focuses on building core competencies in web design and development. The course has two components: HTML and JavaScript The course covers basic to advanced concepts and skills for developing web pages and websites using the most current versions of HTML (HTML5) and CSS (CSS3). Students learn to create dynamic websites that incorporate forms and videos, using JavaScript and CSS (CSS3).. Students are exposed to Dynamic CSS as well. The second half of the course covers the fundamentals of JavaScript language, object-oriented JavaScript as well as AJAX.

CPT 212 C# Programming with Visual Studio.Net Pre-Requisites: CPT 101(pre- or co-requisite), MAT 102, CPT 121
This course uses C# as the programming language for software development; however, the basic programming concepts presented can be applied to a number of other languages. Instead of focusing on the syntax of the C# language, this course uses the C# language to present general programming concepts. Once you develop a thorough understanding of one programming language, you can effectively apply those concepts to other programming languages.

CPT 222: Web Development II Pre-Requisites: CPT 101, CPT 121, CPT 210, MAT 102
This course focuses on the Server-Side Web Development and concentrates primarily on the use of PHP/MySQL. The course is divided into various topics: PHP, MySQL, Object oriented PHP, PHP MVC, Secure Web applications. Students will work with these technologies and apply them to real word scenarios.

CPT 210 Databases I Pre-Requisites: CPT 101, MAT 102
This course will give students a solid foundation in database design and implementation. It provides in-depth coverage of database design, demonstrating that the key to successful database implementation is in proper design of databases to fit within a larger strategic view of the data environment. Topics covered include: How C++/Java is used to develop Web-based database applications, as well as relational data model, SQL and manipulating relational data; applications programming for relational databases; physical characteristics of databases; achieving performance and reliability with database systems; object-oriented and distributed information systems.

CPT 230 Mobile Application Development Pre-Requisites: CPT 101, CPT 210, MAT 102, one semester of any programming language
Students study the design and development principles for mobile iOS applications using the Swift language. The course also provides general knowledge of mobile hardware; cell networks; mobile architectures, operating systems, languages, development environments and simulators, and user interfaces; location-based services; data storage and retrieval.

CPT 250 Software Documentation Pre-Requisites: CPT 101, COM 101, COM 102, CPT 210, one semester of any programming language, recommended - CPT 121
In this course, students will learn the essentials of writing both printed and online computer documentation that is simple, clear, interesting and user-friendly. Students will create hardware and software documentation with economy, clarity, and authority that is accessible to both beginning and experienced end-users. Students will gain the information needed to produce effective technical documents, while developing good writing styles

CPT 301 Information Security Pre-Requisites: CPT 101, CPT 303 (pre- or co-requisite), recommended – CPT 210, one semester of any programming language
This course explores the field of information security and assurance, including new innovations in technology and methodologies. The course provides comprehensive coverage of the topic that includes a historical overview of information security, discussions on risk management and security technology, current certification information, and more. Particular focus and emphasis will be given to network security capabilities and mechanisms (Access Control on wire-line and wireless networks), IPsec, Firewalls, Deep Packet Inspection and Transport security. The final portion of the course will address Network Application security (Email, Ad-hoc, XML/SAML and Services Oriented Architecture security).

CPT 202 Operating Systems Pre-Requisites: CPT 101, CPT 210, recommended – one semester of any programming language
This course teaches the theory and technical information students will need in order to work with today's popular operating systems, such as Windows, Mac OS, and UNIX/Linux platforms. Topics include operating system theory, installation, upgrading, configuring (operating system and hardware), file systems, security, hardware options, and storage, as well as resource sharing, network connectivity, maintenance, and troubleshooting.

CPT 240 Programming in C++ Pre-Requisites: CPT 101(pre- or co-requisite), MAT 102, CPT 121
An Introduction to Programming with C++, the course is distinct in its unique approach, which motivates students by demonstrating why they need to learn the concepts and skills presented. The program presents a balanced approach to program development and ANSI C. Pointers are introduced gradually. Students will gain knowledge in Top-Down Design with Functions, Selection Structures, Repetition and Loop Statements, as well as Multiprocessing Using Processes and Threads.

CPT 311 Fundamentals of Networking Pre-Requisites: CPT 101, CPT 301 (pre- or co-requisite), MAT 102, CPT 202 (pre-or co-requisite)
This course is designed to provide a solid foundation in essential networking concepts and methods. This detailed introduction, requiring no previous networking experience, covers all of the critical knowledge and skills information technology professionals need to work with network operating systems in a network administration environment. Topics include discussion of fundamental aspects of Internet applications layer (HTTP, FTP, DNS), TCP, UDP socket programming, reliable data transfer, congestion control, network layer (Ipv4 and Ipv6) and routing, link layer and Local Area Networks (LAN), multimedia networking (RTSP, RTP, RSVP, DiffServ), and security in computer networks.

CPT 450 Systems Analysis and Design I Pre-Requisites: CPT 101, CPT 121, CPT 210, CPT 250, CPT 301, CPT 202, two semesters of any programming language (at least one Object-Oriented language), MAT 102, MAT 202, Recommended- CPT 311
Part I of a two-part course, this course presents the latest systems development methods, tools, and techniques. This segment of the year-long course concentrates on the fundamentals of systems design, analysis of information requirements, and the analysis process.

CPT 460 Software Architecture: Design, Implementation, and Testing Pre-Requisites: CPT 101,CPT 121, CPT 210, CPT 212, CPT 301, CPT 202, CPT 450, two semesters of any programming language (at least one Object-Oriented language), MAT 102, MAT 201, MAT 202, Recommended- CPT 230, CPT 311
This course introduces the concepts and best practices of software architecture-how a software system is structured and how that system's elements are meant to interact. Distinct from the details of implementation, algorithm, and data representation, an architecture holds the key to achieving system quality, is a reusable asset that can be applied to subsequent systems, and is crucial to a software organization's business strategy. The course is structured around the concept of architecture influence cycles. Each cycle shows how architecture influences, and is influenced by, a particular context in which architecture plays a critical role. Contexts include technical relations, the life cycle of a project, an organization's business profile, and the architect's professional practices.

CPT 470 Cloud Computing Pre-Requisites: CPT 101, CPT 121, CPT 210, CPT 222, CPT 230, CPT 301, CPT 311, CPT 450, CPT 460, MAT 102, MAT 201, MAT 202, one semester of any object-oriented programming language
This course delivers a comprehensive study of Cloud concepts and capabilities throughout the different Cloud service models: Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS), Platform as a Service (PaaS), Software as a Service (SaaS), and Business Process as a Service (BPaaS). Current Cloud vendors such as, Google App Engine, Microsoft Azure, Eucalyptus, and OpenStack will be discussed in depth.

CPT 480: Big Data Prerequisites: CPT 101, MAT 102, MAT 202, CPT 111 OR CPT 205, CPT 203; Recommended: CPT 307, CPT 400

The field of computer science is experiencing a transition from computation-intensive to data-intensive problems, where data is produced in massive amounts by large sensor networks, new data acquisition techniques, simulations, and social networks. Efficiently extracting, interpreting, and learning from very large datasets requires a new generation of scalable algorithms as well as new data management technologies.

ECO 101 Principles of Macroeconomics
This course emphasizes the real-world relevance of economics for today’s students. Through the use of current news articles, realistic case studies, and engaging problems, students will be introduced to how markets work, the welfare state of markets, data of macroeconomics, effects of economic market growth, open economics, and the fluctuation of markets.

ECO 102 Principles of Microeconomics
This course emphasizes the real-world relevance of economics for today’s students. Through the use of current news articles, realistic case studies, and engaging problems, students will be introduced to supply and demand of how markets work and the welfare state of markets, economics of the public sector, market production costs, organization of the market industry, economics of labor markets, and consumer choice of economics.

EDU 101 Foundations of Early Childhood Education *
The student course covers young children’s development and developmentally appropriate early childhood educational practices, from 0 - Grade 3, with a focus on toddler programs and preschool classrooms. The course focuses on the study of physical, social, emotional, cognitive, language, and aesthetic development in young children and methods employed in an early childhood program that best support children’s learning and development through appropriate expectations, activities, and materials. Students are taught to make connections between theory and classroom practice.

EDU 201 Education of Exceptional Children in Early Childhood and Elementary School *
The course covers the characteristics associated with exceptional learners and the basic approaches to differentiating instruction to support early childhood and elementary school students with special needs. Students will also be able to discuss the history of special education, identify the laws that mandate services to exceptional children, understand the influence of families and culture, and display familiarity with the professional ethics and experiences of special education teachers.

EDU 202 Infant and Toddler Development and Care *
The course covers the basic principles underlying the development of children ages 0-3 and demonstrate the key skills required for planning and facilitating a holistic curriculum for infants and toddlers in early childhood programs. The course focuses on the physical, cognitive, social and emotional development of infants and toddlers, with an emphasis on the connection between theory and practice.

EDU 221 Play and Development in the Early Years *
The course covers the basic principles underlying the development of young children and the role of play in both child development and the early childhood classroom. Topics in this course include: the connections between play and children’s development in areas such as cognition and emergent language, play as the basis of the preschool curriculum, and the importance of play for optimum physical and emotional child development.

EDU 301 Literacy in Early Childhood Education and Elementary School *
The course discusses literacy development. Topics include emergent literacy, balanced literacy, methods of organizing literature-based reading programs, strategies for supporting writing, and facilitating second language learning. Studies will apply general instructional strategies and strategies for adapting instruction to meet the needs of diverse learners.

EDU 302 Mathematics, Science, and Social Studies in Early Childhood Education *
The course covers the basic principles underlying the development and planning of the integration of mathematics, science, and social studies in the early childhood classroom. Topics in this course include: the use of manipulatives and other materials to teach math and science in a hands-on way; key concepts of the preschool math curriculum (number operation, patterns, geometry, and measurement), the processes of observing, classifying, and comparing to demonstrate the scientific process, and the use of social studies as a framework for thematic and interdisciplinary curriculum planning and multicultural education.

EDU 401 The Paraeducator
A paraeducator plays a critical role in the educational system. This course examines the definition and responsibilities of paraeducators. Relevant factors and theories of child development are introduced. Emphasis is placed on intervention and instructional techniques and strategies as well as appropriate assessments and monitoring. This course also prepares a student for the ETS Parapro Assessment.

GRD 101 Basics of Graphic Design
The Basics of Graphic Design course comprises the history of graphic design, the current technology, as well as the design principles to give a rich, well-rounded view of this ever-evolving field. The program will offer students information on perception, layout dynamics, in addition to illustration and photography in design.

GRD 102 Principles of Design Pre-requisite: GRD 101
The program combines beginning design principles with design skills and software instruction. Ideal for introductory students in graphic design, the course walks students through the concepts of the creative process by presenting information concerning principles, elements, process, applications, as well as employment.

GRD 111 Design Layout Pre-requisites: GRD 101
The program instructs students on certain layout and grids standards in addition to principles that are important for any job from brochures to annual reports, posters, websites, and publications. The course will outline and demonstrate basic layout/grid guidelines and rules including choosing the typeface for the project, striving for rhythm and balance with type, combining typefaces, using special characters and kerning and legibility.

GRD 120 Typography Pre-requisites: GRD 101, GRD 111
The program focuses exclusively on the typographic features of graphic design. Students gain a comprehensive overview of the vast array of type capabilities, from the basics of character-level formatting to strategies for designing complex layouts using grids.

GRD 130 Multimedia Design Pre-requisites: GRD 101
Students learn the basic elements of multimedia and the skills required for a successful multimedia career. The course explains how to incorporate text, images, sound, animation, and video into compelling projects. Students discover how to design, organize, produce, and deliver multimedia projects on the Web, CD-ROM, and DVD.

GRD 200 Digital Layout Pre-requisites: GRD 101, GRD 102
The Digital Layout course offers students the knowledge of the essential features of industry-standard software applications. The curriculum also covers how to integrate these programs into a seamless whole while producing work that conforms to design principles and helping students meet client expectations.

GRD 210 Publication Design Pre-requisites: GRD 101, GRD 111
The program offers students an understanding of the ins and outs of publication design. The course includes information on the design of magazines, literature systems, newsletters, exhibition catalogs, annual reports, newspapers, and retail catalogs. Both current and historical approaches are provided to give students a complete background on design style, application, and techniques involved in creating effective publications.

GRD 201 Packaging Design Pre-requisites: GRD 101, GRD 102, GRD 111, GRD 120
This course provides instruction on marketing and branding strategies and the design of packaging products. The design process, design concepts including brand marks, color schemes and visual graphics are studied. 3D packaging design models and production are emphasized as well as prototype creation. Case studies are reviewed to give students a more practical, hands-on understanding of the framework of today's packaging design business, as well as the legal and environmental considerations.

GRD 205 Typography II Pre-requisites: GRD 101, GRD120
As a continuation of Typography I, this course delves deeper into the fine art of typography in everyday design. Typography will no longer be just text on a page, but rather a form of art within itself.

GRD 202 Web Design for Graphic Designers Pre-requisites: GRD 101, GRD 111, GRD 130
In today’s world, just about anything you need can be found on a website. However, the average time a person spends on any given webpage is less than 60 seconds. What does a website need to have in order to keep the viewer tuned in longer? It is the web designer’s job to create a visually appealing site where the important content is quickly seen, so the user will be attracted and want to stay. This course will teach you what how to design a user friendly website.

GRD CAP Capstone: Portfolio Pre-requisites: GRD 203, GRD 201
The course presents the task of creating that all-important portfolio for today’s print and interactive design fields in a manageable series of steps. The class serves as a helpmate for graphic design students who are planning the design of their portfolio for applications to graduate schools, grants, scholarships, employment opportunities, and fellowships. In addition, this course is designed to provide examples and real-world advice to assist the student in transitioning from college to the workforce. The course explores a broad variety of areas including employability skills, professional development, searching for the correct job, completing a portfolio and resume, interview techniques, workplace dynamics, networking, and conflict resolution

HEB 101 Elementary Modern Hebrew *
The course covers basic conversational skills, displaying comprehension of high-frequency commands, courtesy formulae and simple statements and questions, demonstrating an ability to formulate basic responses to them, and answering questions in Hebrew based on elementary-level listening comprehension passages. Students will also study simple reading passages, and learn how to extract meaning from a string of connected sentences when context or background knowledge are supportive. We will read texts, both silently and aloud, study the Hebrew consonant and vowel systems, learn how to analyze Hebrew words as to their roots, prefixes and suffixes, identify parts of speech, learn the basic rules of Hebrew pronunciation, learn to recognize basic grammatical structures when vocabulary is known or supplied, and identify basic words for foods, articles and places.

HEB 201 Intermediate Modern Hebrew* Pre-requisites: HEB 101
The course continues to expand the students’ knowledge and understanding of written and spoken Hebrew, including comprehension of complex sentences, the ability to converse for longer periods of time regarding a variety of topics; work out the meaning of longer utterances; and answer aural questions in Hebrew after listening to an intermediate level Hebrew story. Students will learn how to consistently identify the Who, What, When and Where in short connected texts on basic subjects; work out the meaning of longer passages using textual cues, identify most past, present, and future tense forms of frequent verbs in all Hebrew verb patterns, thereby grasping the chronological sequence of events, meet practical and social writing needs on topics related to the writer’s immediate environment, such as biographical details, school and work, take brief notes on familiar topics and respond in writing to personal questions, write in somewhat descriptive paragraphs, demonstrating full control of simple sentences and use of more complex sentences linked by conjunctions, and translate an intermediate level Hebrew text into English, translate an intermediate level English text into Hebrew.

HEB 301 Advanced Modern Hebrew I * Pre-requisites: HEB 201
The course helps advance intermediate students into more advanced Modern Hebrew speech, comprehension, reading, and writing.

HIS 102 World History
The goal of this course is to introduce students to the major stages of world history through learning about the development of people and major societies. The course includes social, cultural, political and economic history and examines key civilizations in world history. The content of the course consists of human origins to agrarian communities, classical civilizations of the world, the post-classical era, expanding webs of interaction, revolutions and the age of empire, and the globalized world..

JCAL 101 Jewish Calendar: Chanuka and Purim
In this course, students explore a selection of interpretations surrounding the festivals of Purim and Chanukah. Students examine the esoteric meaning of these days by studying such works as the Sefas Emes, Bnai Yissoschor, and Shem Mishmuel. Students also look at the historical, legal, and ethical aspects of these festivals.

JCAL 102 Jewish Calendar III: Purim, Pesach and Sefiras Haomer
This course analyzes the sanctity, significance, and special powers inherent in the festivals of Pesach and Shavuot. It also takes a multifaceted look at the period between these two festivals known as sefirat homer (the counting of the omer).

JCAL 201 Jewish Calendar: Days of Awe
The Days of Awe, beginning with the month of Elul and concluding with Sukkot, are days of repentance, introspection, self-definition, prayer, and ultimate joy. This course takes a comprehensive look at this emotionally charged period, particularly focusing on the Rosh HaShana and Yom Kippur prayers, explaining their structure, the logical sequence of the prayers, and the meaning and symbolism of key tefillot (prayers). Students also examine Rabbi Joseph B. Soloveitchik's important work on Jewish Thought, Al HaTeshuva, which discusses repentance and self-improvement as a means to growth and ascension in service of Hashem.

JCAL 202 Jewish Calendar: Remembering the Destruction
Jerusalem was once a city that shone with the Divine Presence and rang with the sounds of people serving their Creator. Today, the Temple no longer stands, and our primary goal of sanctifying the name of Hashem seems to be muted. What were the causes of this destruction? What should we do to return to our former glory as G-d's Holy people, serving Him in Jerusalem? How can we deepen our appreciation of Jewish unity in order to rectify the sin of disunity that caused the destruction? This thought-provoking course explores these questions, and other topics relating to the Three Weeks, The Ninth of Av, and the Tenth of Tevet which commemorate the destruction of the Temple.

JHIS 101: A Survey of Jewish History: The Destruction of the Second Temple to the Establishment of the State of Israel *
The covers the history of the Jewish people from the destruction of the second temple until the establishment of the State of Israel; post- destruction existence in Israel, settlement in Babylon, development of the Talmud, influences of Rome, Christianity and Islam, transition to Spain and Europe, Pale of Settlement, Chassidic movement, reformation, Zionism, etc . The course focuses on major population movements, economic and religious survival, influences of the host nations, chronology and basic geography, development of the Talmud and it commentaries and major figures during these eras.

JLAW 101 Chafetz Chayim: The Laws of Proper Speech
The Laws of Proper Speech, as codified in the book, Chafetz Chaim, are the foundation of many of the laws governing human interaction. Every class begins with a textual analysis, and then proceeds on to a discussion of real-life examples and ways to apply the principles discussed to daily living. The ultimate goal of the course is to encourage self-awareness and self-improvement in the areas of mitzvot bein adam l'chavero (human relations).

JLAW 331 Jewish Law I: Laws of Daily Living
Study of Halacha, Jewish law: Students will study a halachic text such as Shulchan Aruch and a commentary on it, such as Mishneh Berurah or Aruch Hashulchan. Students will study the first section of Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chayim.

JLAW 301 Laws of Shabbat III
This course contains an in-depth study of the Laws of Honoring Shabbat and the Laws of Prohibited Activity on Shabbat. Using Biblical verses as a starting point, students follow the halachic discussion in the Talmud, and then go on to the halachic rulings of the Medieval and Contemporary commentaries, ending with the final Halacha as it applies today. Main topics covered are candle lighting, Lechem Mishneh, eating three meals on Shabbat, Kiddush, and Havdalah, the nature and differentiation of Avot Melacha (primary prohibited activities) and Toldot Melacha (subsidiaries of the Avot Melacha), the prohibition of Gozez (cutting) and Borer (sorting) on Shabbat, and the complex halachot (laws) of unintentional melachot and Psik Reisha.

JLAW 401 Laws of Shabbat IV
This course contains an in-depth study of various melachot, or prohibited activities on Shabbat. Using Biblical verses as a starting point, students follow the halachic discussion in the Talmud, and then go on to the halachic rulings of the Medieval and Contemporary commentaries, ending with the final halacha as it applies today. Main topics covered are cooking and reheating food on Shabbat, benefitting from a prohibited activity on Shabbat, and the melachot of dosh (grinding), memachek (erasing), sechita (wringing), libun (washing), and kotev (writing).

JLAW 332 Jewish Law II: Laws of the Festivals
Study of Halacha, Jewish law: Students will study a halachic text such as Shulchan Aruch and a commentary on it, such as Mishneh Berurah or Aruch Hashulchan. Students will study the third section of Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chayim.

JPHL 101 Fundamentals of Jewish Thought
This course explores four fundamental aspects of Jewish philosophy and faith. Part I examines Maimonides’ Thirteen Principles of Faith as well as the philosophical discussions of the Maharal on faith. Part II analyzes the concept of trust in G-d as the ultimate provider of all of Man’s needs and desires in this world and the Next World. It explains how to focus on joy as the key to developing a trustful relationship with Hashem, and ways to properly face the challenging areas of life that require trust in G-d. Part III examines the role of the Torah as the source for directing the Jewish nation in their unique task in this world and defines the path towards the ultimate redemption. Part IV concludes with an in-depth analysis of the Ten Commandments and the meaning in mitzvot.

JPHL 201 Writing of Maharal: Netivot Olam and Netzach Yisrael
Students focus on the books Netivot Olam and Netzach Yisrael, by Rabbi Yehuda Loewe, the Maharal of Prague, a seventeenth century rabbi who authored many books of Jewish philosophy. Students will examine the nature of the yetzer hara, the evil inclination. Students will analyze where its power stems from and how to combat it. Students focus on the causes of suffering, and how people can grow from suffering. Additionally, students will examine the nature of discord, and define as well as analyze the inherent qualities of peace. Students will focus on the causes for the destruction of the First and Second Temples, and the changes in perspective and behavior that must occur in order to rectify this damage.

JPHL 220 Character Development: Selections from Tomer Devora, Chovot Halevavot, and Mesilat Yesharim
This course studies selections from the classical ethical works, Chovot HaLevavot by Rabbenu Bachya ibn Pekuda, Tomer Devora by Rabbi Moshe Cordevoro, and Mesilat Yesharim by Rabbi Moshe Chaim Luzzato. Chovot HaLevavot discusses Man’s purpose in the world and his obligations to G-d in belief, behavior and character. Tomer Devora describes how Man should adapt and adopt G-d’s Thirteen Attributes of Mercy, transforming himself from a mere human to a G-dly individual. Mesilat Yesharim follows a step by step plan of ascension to spiritual perfection, based on a Gemara which lists 15 steps to reach Ruach Hakodesh, Divine inspiration. The instructor explicates these fundamental works and looks at key themes found throughout the books and ways in which they can be applied to daily living.

JS210 Judaic Studies Competency Based Project - Elementary
In this project based course, students will work one on one with the instructor to create a project aligned with degree outcomes and the student’s personal interest in Judaism. The content will be basic in nature and will not require advanced Biblical textual skills and extensive knowledge of Biblical Hebrew. Students enrolled in the Judaic Studies concentration will research topics such as Jewish Law, Biblical themes, and Biblical commentaries. Student enrolled in the Talmud concentration will research topics such as the connection between Talmud and Jewish Law, translation of Talmudic Aramaic, and Talmud commentaries. The difficulty and length of time to complete the project will determine the number of credits the student may earn.

JS 310 Judaic Studies Competency Based Project – Advanced
In this project based course, students will work one on one with the instructor to create a project aligned with degree outcomes and the student’s personal interest in Judaism. The content will be advanced in nature and will require advanced Biblical textual skills and extensive knowledge of Biblical Hebrew. Students enrolled in the Judaic Studies concentration will research topics such as Jewish Law, Biblical themes, and Biblical commentaries. Student enrolled in the Talmud concentration will research topics such as the connection between Talmud and Jewish Law, translation of Talmudic Aramaic, and Talmud commentaries. The difficulty and length of time to complete the project will determine the number of credits the student may earn.

JTHO 100: Introduction to the Oral Law
This course presents an overview of the structure and content of the Oral Law. The course focuses on Maimonides monumental works on this subject. The course compares Maimonides understanding with other commentaries views regarding the subject. Topics include the history of the Oral Law, identifying important authorities and works, and the development of law through the ages.

JTHO 102 The Festivals: Fundamental Concepts *
The course covers all of the major Jewish holidays (shalosh regalim, fast days, Purim, Chanuka and High Holidays); their Biblical sources, historical background, legal details and their reasoning and major themes.

JTHO 111 The Sabbath: Fundamental Concepts *
The course covers the customs of the Sabbath, their underlying concepts and themes, and will provide students with a familiarity with all of the aspects Sabbath (the 39 melachos, Kiddush, oneg and kavod, rabbinical restrictions, etc.); their Biblical sources, historical background, legal details and their reasoning and major themes.

JTHO 202Jewish Liturgy: Advanced Concepts *
The course presents an overview and analysis of the text of the essential sections of the traditional Jewish Siddur (Brachos, Supplications, Selections of Psalms and the Tanach) with a range of midrashic, medieval and modern commentaries; elaborate underlying meanings found in the text, expound on vague or obscure passages, explain halachic practices woven into the prayers, describe historical origins and explain various metaphysical allusions. The course covers the essential sections of the traditional Jewish Siddur (Holy Names, Structure of Blessings, Birkas HaShachar, Birkas HaTorah, Psukei Dezimra, Shema and its Brachos, Amida, Aleinu) with a range of midrashic, medieval and modern commentaries.

JTHO 211 The Sabbath: Advanced Concepts *
The course presents an overview and analysis of the aspects of the Sabbath, and teaches students how to identify their historical and spiritual underpinnings, approach legal difficulties on a sophisticated level, recall and discuss the thematic structure of the halachos and minhagim of the Sabbath; identify and differentiate between each of the 39 melachos together with the other positive and negative aspects of the Sabbath; their sources, symbolism and halachic parameters.

LIT 101: Literature I
This course is designed to help students develop critical thinking through literary analysis. Literature helps develop students' analytical skills as they evaluate and probe the topics and issues discussed for hundreds of years. Famous books and authors will be chosen that engender deep thought, debates and logical reasoning.

MAT 101 College Mathematics
College Mathematics is the study of quantity, structure, space, and change. Through the use of abstraction and logical reasoning, the class will take students from whole numbers, calculation, and measurement, to the systematic study of the shapes and motions of physical objects.

MAT 102 Algebra
The study of algebra will assist students in the rules for manipulating formulae and algebraic expressions involving unknowns and real or complex numbers. The course facilitates the study of properties and patterns that seemingly are a different form of mathematical concepts. Students will gain a thorough grounding in the concepts central to their success in mathematics by successfully connecting from concept to concept.

MAT 201 Calculus: Pre-requisites: MAT 102
During this course, students will learn that calculus is the study of how things change. It will provide a framework for modeling systems in which there is change, and a way to deduce the predictions of such models. The course will focus on limits, functions, derivatives, integrals, and infinite series.

MAT 202 Statistics: Pre-requisites: MAT 102
This course is designed to introduce students to Statistics, which is the science of the collection, organization, and interpretation of data. Students will deal with all the aspects of statistics including the planning of data collection in terms of the design of surveys and experiment. The course provides a first exposure to Statistics I that focuses on technological skills to increase statistical literacy, with detailed explanations presented in an easy conversational writing style. The lessons use a step-by-step problem-solving approach that helps students understand complex statistical concepts, while incorporating educational trends that stress student understanding of basic statistical concepts with the help of technological devices.

MUS 101 Jewish Music *
The course presents a detailed overview of Jewish Music from biblical times until the modern era, historical development, key figures, ceremonial and holiday music and recognize recordings of different musical genres.

NUT 101 Nutrition
Students achieve a solid grounding in fundamental nutritional principles and how to apply them to make informed, healthy choices.

BIBL 210 Yechezkel
Students study the first half of the book of Yechezkel, Ezekiel. The instructor explains the pshat, or basic meaning of the text, utilizing classical commentaries such as Rashi. Additionally, the instructor delves into the deeper meaning and messages of the text, applying its messages to life.

BIBL 311 Yirmiyahu I: Reluctant Prophet
Students study the themes inherent in the first half of the Book of Yirmiyahu. The course focuses on both the structure and beauty of the text, the historical background to the prophecies studied, as well as on the inspiration and spiritual impact that the timeless words of Yirmiyahu have on our lives today.

BIBL 312 Yirmiyahu II: Prophet of Destruction Pre-requisite: BIBL 311
Students study the themes inherent in the second half of the Book of Yirmiyahu. The course focuses on both the structure and beauty of the text, the historical background to the prophecies studied, as well as on the inspiration and spiritual impact that the timeless words of Yirmiyahu have on our lives today.

PSY 101 Introduction to Psychology
The introductory course to psychology will provide students in the applied and academic field studies of the human mind and behavior. Students will seek to understand and explain thought, emotion and behavior. The course will provide a broad view of psychology as well as applications of knowledge gained from contemporary research to problems and challenges students face in today’s world.

PSY 201 Introduction to Counseling Pre-requisites: PSY 101
This course will give students an overview of the field of counseling psychology, its history, theories and methods. Students will also be introduced to the ethical and legal challenges of this profession as it is practiced in a multicultural society. In addition students will become acquainted with the many applications and settings in which counseling takes place.

PSY 202 Psychological Statistics Pre-requisite: MAT 102
This course surveys the statistical techniques commonly used in the behavioral and social sciences, especially psychology and education. The course emphasizes the importance of looking at the data before formulating a hypothesis, using plotting data, looking for outliers, and checking assumptions. Additionally, the course underlines the importance of the relationship between the statistical test to be employed and the theoretical questions being posed by the experiment. The course is designed to assist the student in understanding statistical data, the purpose of experimenting, and how predictions assist in creating a theory.

PSY 210 Social Psychology Pre-requisites: PSY 101
This course looks at a wide range of social topics, including social cognition, perception, and interaction including the effects of stereotyping, prejudice, and discrimination. Additionally, a study of self, relationships, and prosocial behavior will be studied. The course consists of the consequences of belonging through comparing group versus individual feelings. The course will integrate current topics such as self-esteem, plastic surgery, philanthropy, bullying, sororities, and age discrimination with social awareness, leadership, nonverbal behavior, and aggression.

PSY 301 Forensic Psychology Pre-requisites: PSY 101, PSY 300
The course will help students differentiate between supported and unsupported psychological techniques used in courts and steer clear of those that may be misleading or legally inadmissible. The class will cover controversial issues surrounding recovered memories, projective techniques, lie detection, child witnesses, offender rehabilitation, psychopathy, violence risk assessment, and more.

PSY 302 Research in Psychology Pre-requisites: PSY 101, pre- or co-requisite: PSY 202, or MAT 202
Students will be introduced to commonly used research methods applied in Psychology. Basic guidelines of how to write, format, and publish will be taught as well as a hands-on approach to conducting research in psychology. The course will engage students who are at varying levels of exposure to research methods. Students will learn to embrace the ethics and process of collecting and presenting useful, accurate data.

PSY 102 Developmental Psychology Pre or Co-requisite: PSY 101
Students will be provided with a balanced coverage of the entire life span. The course will utilize a modified chronological approach that traces development from conception through late life, while also dedicating information to important topical issues pertaining to particular points in the life span.

PSY 300 Abnormal Psychology Pre-requisites: PSY 101, PSY 102
The course will fully integrate the details of all the disorders and distinguish between the more important concepts. The aim is for students to comprehend the important comparisons and contrasts to mental disorders, health psychology, as well as psychotic disorders. The class will define the difference between normal and abnormal behavior.

PSY 310 Tests and Measurements Pre-requisites: PSY 101, PSY 302
The curriculum offers a clear overview of psychological testing and measurement basics. In addition, the course covers the applications of tests and examines the issues shaping the future of testing.

PSY 320 Drugs and Behavior Pre-requisites: PSY 101
The lessons are designed to provide students with the latest information on drugs and their effects on society and human behavior. Students will discover how to examine substance abuse from the behavioral, pharmacological, historical, social, legal, and clinical perspectives.

PSY 330 Biological Psychology Pre-requisites: PSY 101
In Bio psych, students discover the complexities of the brain and how it controls behavior. Feelings, emotions, language and memory all connect to the brain and all impact how we behave. Students explore the nervous system, reproductive behaviors and sleep patterns and how they affect the brain. Students examine how these biological functions are involved in different psychological disorders.

PSY 340 Fundamentals of Life Coaching Pre-requisites: PSY 101
The International Coach Federation Core Competencies and NLP processes are used as the foundation of this course. During the semester, students will practice ethical and professional standards while learning how to develop a relationship, communicate, create plans, and measure accountability with clients

PSY 430 Cognitive Psychology Pre-requisites: PSY 101, PSY 302
Traditional approaches are combined with the cutting-edge cognitive neuroscience approach to create a comprehensive, coherent and totally up-to-date overview of all the main fields in cognitive psychology. The major topics covered include perception, attention, memory, concepts, language, problem solving, and reasoning, as well as some applied topics such as everyday memory.

PSY 303 Personalities Pre-requisites: PSY 101
The program gives students a clear and cogent understanding of the field of personality psychology. The course discusses major theorists who represent psychoanalytic, neo-psychoanalytic, life-span, trait, humanistic, cognitive, behavioral, and social-learning approaches, while demonstrating the influence of events in theorists' personal and professional lives on the development of these theories.

PSY 450 Behavior Modification Pre-requisites: PSY 101, PSY 303
The module helps students master the principles and concepts of behavior modification. The course uses a precise, step-by-step scientific approach to explain human behavior, using numerous case studies and interesting examples to help illustrate the key principles.

PSY CAP Capstone PSY 101, should be taken only after having completed a minimum of 6 psychology courses
This course is designed to provide examples and real-world advice to assist the student in transitioning from college to the workforce. The course explores a broad variety of areas including employability skills, professional development, searching for the correct job, completing a portfolio and resume, interview techniques, workplace dynamics, networking, and conflict resolution. Additionally, each student will be assigned to work in a supervised environment, serving community psychological needs.

BIBL 221 The Books of Daniel and Trei Asar
The book of Daniel is a unique part of the Written Torah. It is mainly written in Aramaic and describes the fascinating and inspirational life of the prophet Daniel. Students will study Daniel, focusing on timeless messages, many of which relate to the Exile and its eventual end. In the second part of the course, the instructor explores Trei Asar, the shorter prophesies of the late Era of Prophecy. These prophecies speak of pivotal concepts such as sin, retribution, repentance, forgiveness, and redemption.

BIBL 222 Megillot
Students study the five megillot: Esther, Shir HaShirim, Kohelet, Eicha, and Ruth. The course focuses on the basic meaning of the text as well as the deeper meaning within it.

BIBL 421 Tehillim I
Students analyze selected chapters in the book of Tehillim (Psalms). A superficial reading of the text will not reveal the uniqueness of each chapter of Psalms, as praise and pleading seemingly repeat themselves again and again. Through the use of many commentaries, the instructor breaks down every chapter into its components and clarifies the distinctions between them. What emerges is a new understanding and appreciation of the precision and pathos contained in Tehillim.

BIBL 421 Tehillim II
Students analyze selected chapters in the book of Tehillim (Psalms). Through the use of many commentaries, the instructor breaks down every chapter into its components and clarifies the distinctions between them. The course also demonstrates how the structure of the text reflects its themes. What emerges is a new understanding and appreciation of the precision and pathos contained in Tehillim.

SOC 102 Law and Ethics I
The Jewish Bible, or Torah, is one of the oldest and most widely read texts of law, ethics and philosophy. Many of the principles presented in the Torah form the basis of Western ethics, both business and personal.

The portions of the Torah which address proper business interactions and respect for others’ property and rights form the body of knowledge known as Business Halacha, or Jewish Monetary Law. A study of these laws and their logical underpinnings will enable students to develop a moral compass and ethical behavior.

This course presents issues of integrity in business based on practical examples of Jewish law for a moral and upright society. The course presents modern issues in business ethics with examples of contemporary Rabbinic court cases for thought-provoking and engaging discussions. Classes use case studies and various sources to help students understand the underlying principles and thought processes behind business law. The course is designed to offer current topics to encourage lively interaction and debate. From copyright issues, the fine line between profit-making and overcharging, to keeping ones word and accidentally taking someone’s umbrella, content has been selected to assist students in developing solid ethical and legal decisions.

SOC 202 Law and Ethics II
The Jewish Bible, or Torah, is one of the oldest and most widely read texts of law, ethics and philosophy. Many of the principles presented in the Torah form the basis of Western ethics, both business and personal. The portions of the Torah which address proper business interactions and respect for others’ property and rights form the body of knowledge known as Business Halacha, or Jewish Monetary Law. A study of these laws and their logical underpinnings will enable students to develop a moral compass and ethical behavior.

This course presents issues of responsibility in business based on practical examples of Jewish law for a moral and upright society. The course presents modern issues in business ethics with examples of contemporary Rabbinic court cases for thought-provoking and engaging discussions. Classes use case studies and various sources to help students understand the underlying principles and thought processes behind Jewish business law. The course is designed to offer current topics to encourage lively interaction and debate. From employer-employee relations, rented, borrowed, or lost property, to business partnerships and responsibilities of a professional to his client, content has been selected to assist students in developing solid ethical and legal decisions.

TALM 102 Elementary Talmud II *
The course covers six folios of the Babylonian Talmud with the all Rashis (excluding Tosafos style Rashi's); students will become familiar with the reference system (ain mishpat, mesoros hashas), will learn to comprehend and translate all acronyms on the page; and will be able to understand a higher level vocabulary, expressions, rules and patterns. Emphasis is placed on correct reading and comprehension of the Talmudic text with intermediate level Rashi's, a vocabulary of Talmudic terms and idioms and an ability to comprehend Talmudic dialogue.

TALM 110 Introductory Talmud Intensive
In-depth study of Talmud at the introductory level: Students will analyze the text of Talmud line by line in the original Aramaic and study it using Rashi and Tosfot, medieval commentators on the Talmud. Rashi and Tosfot explain the Talmudic discussions and the logical background to the conclusions of the Rabbis. Students will then study the comments and additions of the later commentators, from the 1600s until today. Students will study 3-10 pages of a Tractate in depth, and spend 270 hours in this course over the semester, in a combination of structured preparation time in a Beit Midrash setting and lecture.

TALM 210 Beginning Talmud Intensive
In-depth study of Talmud at the introductory level: Students will analyze the text of Talmud line by line in the original Aramaic and study it using Rashi and Tosfot, medieval commentators on the Talmud. Rashi and Tosfot explain the Talmudic discussions and the logical background to the conclusions of the Rabbis. Students will then study the comments and additions of the later commentators, from the 1600s until today. Students will study 3-10 pages of a Tractate in depth, and spend 270 hours in this course over the semester, in a combination of structured preparation time in a Beit Midrash setting and lecture. Students study of a different section of the tractate that was begun in previous semester or a different tractate.

TALM 220 Beginning Talmud Survey
Study of Talmud at the beginning level: Students will analyze the text at the basic level, focusing on its content and themes. Students study a different section of the tractate that was begun in previous semester or a different tractate.

TALM 301 Advanced Talmud I *
Students will learn advanced Talmudic concepts, such as defining machlokes, svara’s, strengths and weaknesses of different approaches, how to formulate abstract legal categories, become proficient in advanced conceptualization of Talmudic text and commentaries, extracting principles and evaluate the relationship between parts of the legal discussion.

TALM 302 Advanced Talmud II *
In this course, students will learn how to independently prepare a section of the Babylonian Talmud with the entire commentary with an emphasis on the medieval and later commentaries; students will also learn how to define machlokes, svara’s, strengths and weaknesses of different approaches, formulate abstract legal categories, display a proficiency in advanced conceptualization of Talmudic text and commentaries, extracting principles and evaluate the relationship between parts of the legal discussion. The difference between the Advanced I and Advanced II courses is found in the difficulty of the commentaries assigned, self-preparation of a previously unseen Gemara and its commentaries and complexity of the subjects being analyzed.

TALM 310 Intermediate Talmud Intensive Pre-requisite: TALM 110 or TALM 210
In-depth study of Talmud at the intermediate level: Students will analyze the text of Talmud and study it using Rashi and Tosfot, medieval commentators on the Talmud. They will study 3-10 pages of a Tractate. TALM 410 Advanced Talmud Intensive Pre-requisite: TALM 110 or TALM 210, TALM 310 In-depth study of Talmud at the advanced level: Students will analyze the text of Talmud and study it using Rashi and Tosfot, medieval commentators on the Talmud. They will study 3-10 pages of a Tractate. Students will study a different section of the tractate that was begun in previous semester or a different tractate.

 


Statement of Ownership: Naaleh College is a subsidiary of Beis Midrash Queens, a registered 501-c3 not-for-profit educational and charitable organization.
Terms and Conditions Privacy Policy Consumer Disclosures Naaleh College, 16375 NE 18th Ave. Suite 304 North Miami Beach, FL 33162 (305) 944-0035 contact@naalehcollege.com